Mohammad Asif slams PCB's double standard policy

Mohammad Asif slams PCB's double standard policy

Mohammad Asif played 22 Tests for Pakistan.

Mohammad Asif | Getty Images

Tainted Pakistan pacer Mohammad Asif slammed double standard policies of the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) dealing with players involved in corruption on Friday.

Asif was caught along with Salaman Butt, and Mohammad Amir in a spot-fixing scandal during the fourth test at Lords against England in 2010 and were banned from the game for five years.

According to a report in Sport Star, Mohammad Asif said, “What I did seven years back was wrong and I regret it. I have served my full punishment and done all that was required of me under the ICC anti-corruption code. However, not once has anyone in the board or National Cricket Academy bothered to even call me and check about my fitness or form.”

Post his five-year ban, he was fantastic with the ball in the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy in the last season and this season he has come up with some smart spells, including six wickets in one session.

Raising questions over Amir’s inclusion into the national side, he added, “I have performed in two seasons and I am fit. I am ready to take any fitness test or undergo intensive training. But the board appears to have double standards. They can allow Mohammad Aamir back into the Pakistan team without any notable comeback performances and support him but for me or Salman Butt, they do not want to touch us and give us another chance in the national team even though we have done well.”

The pacer further added that the PCB needs to adopt uniform policy while treating tainted players, saying, “You cannot treat players differently. I do not want to go into details but all three of us were equally responsible for what happened seven years back in England.”

Asif concluded by saying, “I still remain the best new ball bowler in Pakistan cricket. I have been praised for my bowling skills by the best in cricket. I know the art of using the new ball.”


By Rashmi Nanda - 16 Dec, 2017

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